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Clinical Research Trials

Research Process

Each clinical trial is designed to find specific end results. The trial can either be for pediatric, adults, or both. There are specific exclusion and inclusion criteria to be met in order to be a candidate in each trial. Compensation is provided to candidates for travel.

Asthma

At Kern Allergy and Medical Research, we currently have seven new studies going on. We offer
biologic trials and inhaler trials. Each clinical trial is designed to find specific end results. If you
or a loved one has asthma, you may be interested in one of our new, no-cost research studies
for asthmatics.

Study Participant Requirements:
– At least 12 years of age
– Must have been diagnosed with asthma for at least one year.

Qualified participants will receive at no cost:
– Investigational drug for asthma
– Study-related care from our doctors
– Compensation for your travel and time

Definition
Asthma is a condition in which your airways narrow and swell and produce extra mucus. This
can make breathing difficult and trigger coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath.
For some people, asthma is a minor nuisance. For others, it can be a major problem that
interferes with daily activities and may lead to a life-threatening asthma attack.
Asthma can’t be cured, but its symptoms can be controlled. Because asthma often changes
over time, it’s important that you work with your doctor to track your signs and symptoms and
adjust treatment as needed.

Symptoms
Symptoms of asthma can be mild or severe. You may have mild attacks now and then, or you
may have severe symptoms every day, or you may have something in between. How often you
have symptoms can also change. When you have asthma, you may:
 Wheeze, making a loud or soft whistling noise that occurs when you breathe in and out.
 Cough a lot.
 Feel tightness in your chest.
 Feel short of breath.
 Have trouble sleeping because of coughing or having a hard time breathing.
 Quickly get tired during exercise.
 Your symptoms may be worse at night.
 Severe asthma attacks can be life-threatening and need emergency treatment.

How is Asthma Diagnosed?
Along with doing a physical exam and asking about your health, your doctor may order lung
function tests. These tests include:
 Spirometry. Doctors use this test to diagnose and keep track of asthma. It measures
how quickly you can move air in and out of your lungs and how much air you move.
 Peak expiratory flow (PEF). This shows how fast you can breathe out when you try your
hardest.
 An exercise or inhalation challenge. This test measures how quickly you can breathe
after exercise or after taking a medicine.
 A chest X-ray, to see if another disease is causing your symptoms.
 Allergy tests, if your doctor thinks your symptoms may be caused by allergies.

COPD

At Kern Allergy and Medical Research, we currently have four COPD trials. We offer both
biologic and inhaler trials. . Each clinical trial is designed to find specific end results. If you or a
loved one has COPD, you may be interested in one of our new, no-cost research COPD
studies.

Study Participant Requirements:
– At least 40 years of age
– Must have been diagnosed with COPD for at least one year.
– Have at least a 10 pack smoking history

Qualified participants will receive at no cost:
– Investigational drug for asthma
– Study-related care from our doctors
– Compensation for your travel and time

Definition
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease, usually caused by smoking, in
which the airways of the lungs narrow over time making it difficult to breathe. The narrowing of
the lungs limits airflow, causing shortness of breath (dyspnea).

Description
COPD is often a mix of two diseases:
 Chronic bronchitis. In chronic bronchitis, the airways that carry air to the lungs (bronchial
tubes) get inflamed and make a lot of mucus. This can narrow or block the airways,
making it hard for you to breathe.
 Emphysema. In a healthy person, the tiny air sacs in the lungs are like balloons. As you
breathe in and out, they get bigger and smaller to move air through your lungs. But with
emphysema, these air sacs are damaged and lose their stretch. Less air gets in and out
of the lungs, which makes you feel short of breath.

Causes and Symptoms
COPD is almost always caused by smoking. Over time, breathing tobacco smoke irritates the airways and destroys the stretchy fibers in the lungs.
Other things that may put you at risk include breathing chemical fumes, dust, or air pollution over a long period of time. Secondhand smoke is also bad.
It usually takes many years for the lung damage to start causing symptoms, so COPD is most common in people who are older than 60.
You may be more likely to get COPD if you had a lot of serious lung infections when you were a child.

The main symptoms of COPD are:
 A long-lasting (chronic) cough
 Mucus that comes up when you cough
 Shortness of breath that gets worse when you exercise

As COPD gets worse, you may be short of breath even when you do simple things like get dressed or fix a meal. It gets harder to eat or exercise, and breathing takes much more energy. People often lose weight and get weaker.

At times, your symptoms may suddenly flare up and get much worse. This is called a COPD exacerbation. An exacerbation can range from mild to life-threatening. The longer you have COPD, the more severe these flare-ups will be.